Archive | March 2013

Dancing for a Cause

Tomorrow evening, Saturday March 23rd the Eubie Blake National Jazz Institute and Cultural Center will be filled with two floors of dancing. Dancing for a Cause, the second annual fundraiser for Jubilee Arts, celebrates the many dance styles that originated within Harlem and have continued to grow across the country. The styles of Chicago Step, Hand Dance, and Line Dance, which will be highlighted at the event, are taught at Jubilee Arts “as a way to preserve and revive the legacy of arts in the African-American community.” In addition to an evening of dancing, guests will also enjoy light fare, performances, door prizes, and auctions. Dancing for a Cause is particularly timely following last month’s social and news media obsession with the Harlem Shake videos. Coverage of the videos were often void of any conversations regarding the dance /videos’ cultural or historical significance, highlighting how important and needed Jubilee Arts’ work is.

All proceeds for the event will help support the operations of Jubilee Arts and their programming which focuses on providing low cost dance, visual arts, creative writing and ceramics classes/programs to Baltimore communities of all ages.

Tickets for the event are $35 and can be purchased ahead of time online.

For more information on the event please visit the event page on Facebook.

When:
Saturday, March 23rd
8pm- 12am 
 
Where:
Eubie Blake Center- 847 North Howard St. 

Mapping Baltimore: GBCA’s Brown Bag

The Baltimore Art + Justice Project assisted yesterday with the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance’s “Map it Now” Brown Bag. BA+JP’s Kalima Young and Rebecca Yenawine from New Lens co-facilitated the packed event where many individuals presented their organizations’ maps and data collection experiences. Public Laboratory, Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, Baltimore Jazz Alliance, Story of Place Project, Arts Everyday, Power In Dirt, Baltimore Green Space were some of the groups whose efforts were shared and discussed at the event.

Throughout the conversation the importance of art in the community was continually referenced and the effect that research and visual tools, such as maps, can have on showing the positive impact art and cultural programs have on communities. Some of the issues and challenges that were raised related to collaborating and bringing in new people. The Greater Baltimore Tech Council and the Tech and Social Change Baltimore Meet up Group were discussed as two good ways that arts, cultural, and justice based workers could reach out to individuals in the tech community looking to collaborate.

Continuing the Conversation: What have been some of your challenges and experiences collecting data and mapping Baltimore’s cultural,  arts, and justice based communities? What have you found?

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