Tag Archive | change

Artists Within Spotlight: Y-LLEAD – Healing the Self to Heal the Community

Created by designer and activist Melissa Moore, the Youth Learning Lab of Education and Applied Design (Y-LLEAD) in Greenmount West is a youth-led + intergenerational supported design, build, and community activation program.

A typical Y-LLEAD session begins with setting an intention and closes with similar activities. Youth participant Talayia Bowman explains, “We come and sit in a circle to keep our energy and circulation between us. We start with our meditation/contemplation practice where we ground our feet and sit in an upright position with our backs erect… It’s beneficial. We are still young and pulled in a lot of directions but this helps us be more open to what we want to be, kind and decent to other people.”

Y-LLEAD Learning ExchangeBowman also described the benefits of being in an intentional collaborative learning environment. “I’ve been in programs where the ripple effect only lasts as long as the duration of the program, but here, this is stuff that directly deals with how we view society and how we carry ourselves.” Bowman smiled, and then continued, “I deal with regular challenges… when I leave here, it’s like taking a little ball of optimism outside into the world with me. Being young, people don’t expect us to think through stuff as much as we do. Design thinking means taking something apart layer by layer. This program has helped me learn how to unpack hard situations and I can use [these skills] as soon as I hit the sidewalk outside. Overall I would describe my experience as enlightening,” Bowman explained. “What makes [Y-LLEAD] different is how it is run.  Most programs lie about wanting participants to have a voice, but this place does not.”

Y-LLEAD Participant   Using a combination of healing practices and design thinking, Y-LLEAD    helps participants and facilitators work together to solve complex social  problems. Y-LLEAD learning exchange facilitator Thea Ganlas said, “We  spend a lot of time really listening and hearing everyone’s voice.   It’s  therapeutic for me and it’s almost unfair to get paid for doing it. We learn  how to approach communal work. We talk about everything. We see this  space as safe and whatever we bring to it, we deal with in the healthiest  way possible. I have not seen this work out with other programs – other  programs I’ve been a part of were focused on the business end of the work, not the healing that can come through doing arts-based practice.”

As a facilitator, Ganlas sees Y-LLEAD as a chance to be an ally in communities that are not her own. “I came to Baltimore as a student.  I did not feel connected to the neighborhoods because I stayed inside of a bubble. It is really easy to do. I decided finally that I should find out what it means to live in Baltimore and not let others speak for those experiences. Being a part of Y-LLEAD helps me feel connected to the city I have decided will remain home for now.”

As a Baltimore native, youth participant Bowman offers another perspective on allyship. “I don’t live around [Greenmount West] and a few months ago I would have been like, ‘I don’t live around here, I don’t hang around here and I don’t care about what goes on around here.’ But now I realize I don’t have to live here to care about the neighborhood.”

 

Continuum of Impact: Policy

Our final video addresses the way that art can be used to impact Policy. Jennifer Pelton from the Public Justice Center describes some of the ways that the PJC has incorporated art into advocating policy changes. Through the use of photography, music, youth created art, and other mediums, the PJC knows that art is an effective tool for providing a face to an issue and making the policy changes personal.

To view the complete interview with Jennifer Pelton of the Public Justice Center: Click Here 

To view the rest of the Continuum of Impact videos please visit the Baltimore Art + Justice Project YouTube channel

The Continuum of Impact Video Series is based on the Continuum of Impact created by Animating Democracy, the videos each highlight specific ways that social justice and art collaboration create an impact.

Continuum of Impact: Capacity

Capacity involves the efforts to build strategies for organizing along with raising the status marginalized and disenfranchised communities. Our Capacity video features the Youth Resiliency Institute who provide cultural arts programming and training to youth and their families in Baltimore City. Navasha Daya and Fanon Hill describe the organizations’ methods of using multiple forms of art from dance to poetry to provide an outlet for agency building. Using the creative skills developed through YRI, youth have become become engaged politically, culturally, and locally engaged.

To view the complete interview with Youth Resiliency Institute: Click Here Part 1 | Part 2

To view the rest of the Continuum of Impact videos please visit the Baltimore Art + Justice Project YouTube channel.

Coming up next week……. Action Part 2!

The Continuum of Impact Video Series is based on the Continuum of Impact created by Animating Democracy, the videos each highlight specific ways that social justice and art collaboration create an impact.

Continuum of Impact: Attitudes

Changing the way people feel about an issue is a difficult task to undertake but art can be a helpful medium to do so. Using art, organizers and activists can generate feelings of hope, pride, and respect in both those who engage  in the creation of art and those who view or experience it. Our Attitudes video highlights the work of DewMore Baltimore and 901 Arts who use art to change people’s thought’s and attitudes towards specific issues. Devlon Waddell from DewMore Baltimore describes how they use literary arts to encourage individuals to explore their understanding of themselves to then develop a stronger connection with their community.

To view the complete interview with DewMore Baltimore: Click Here

To view the complete interview with 901 Arts: Click Here

To view the rest of the Continuum of Impact videos please visit the Baltimore Art + Justice Project YouTube channel.

Stay tuned next week for……. Capacity!

The Continuum of Impact Video Series is based on the Continuum of Impact created by Animating Democracy, the videos each highlight specific ways that social justice and art collaboration create an impact.

Continuum of Impact: Discourse

Through art we are able to create safe, affirming, comfortable, or even humorous spaces that allow many to engage in dialogues that couldn’t have happened elsewhere. Our Discourse video highlights the work of Hollaback! Baltimore and Theater Action Group who use art to open up and continue conversations. Shawna from Hollaback! Baltimore describes how individuals who have experienced street harassment have chalked the areas where they have been harassed; creating not only conversations about harassment but empowering experiences of reclaiming spaces. Theater is described by the Theater Action Group as a place where individuals can come together to play, engage, and create a temporary community that engages in dialogue which leads to further social change.

To view the complete interview with Hollaback! Baltimore: Click Here

To view the complete interview with Theater Action Group: Click Part One | Part Two

 To view the rest of the Continuum of Impact videos please visit the Baltimore Art + Justice Project YouTube channel.

Stay tuned next week for……. Attitudes!

The Continuum of Impact Video Series is based on the Continuum of Impact created by Animating Democracy, the videos each highlight specific ways that social justice and art collaboration create an impact.

Continuum of Impact: Action

The anticipation can finally end as the Baltimore Art + Justice Project’s Continuum of Impact video series is complete and online! The series highlights the phenomenal work being done by Baltimore organizations and groups that are using art as a tool for social change. Based on the Continuum of Impact created by Animating Democracy, the videos each highlight specific ways that social justice and art collaboration create an impact.

Action, the first video in the series focuses on increasing participation. Art can be a powerful tool to get people involved and mobilized in their communities. Our Action video highlights the work of 901 Arts. 901 Arts is a community based youth arts organization in the Better Waverly neighborhood of Baltimore that provides opportunities for the children and youth in the community to express their artistic sides and develop as artists.

To view the complete interview with 901 Arts and the rest of the Continuum of Impact videos please visit the Baltimore Art + Justice Project YouTube page

Health Care for the Creative Class

As an artist or organizer you may be wondering how the changes under the Affordable Care Act will impact you. If so you are in luck! The Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance has collaborated with Healthcare Access Maryland to answer your questions at a free event on October 16th. At the forum representatives from Healthcare Access Maryland will explain what the Maryland Health Connection is, how you can shop, compare rates and coverage options, and enroll in health coverage right for you.

While the event is FREE, you do need to register. Click here to register.

For more information on the forum please contact Melanie Robey at mrobey@baltimoreculture.org

When: October 16th, 2013 @ 6:30PM-8:00PM

Where:

                Baltimore Theatre Project
                45 W. Preston St.
                Baltimore, MD 21202

Move This World 4th Global Summit

Looking for a way to get moving and develop strategies for social change this weekend? The Move This World 4th Global Summit is taking place is Baltimore this weekend on Saturday, September 21st through Sunday, September 22nd. The Summit brings together activists, artists, students and educators to learn Move this World’s evidence-based curriculum using creative movements to spark social change.  Those in attendance will collaborate in a variety of activities led by MTW’s PeaceMover Facilitators and global staff, engage in group dialogues, self-reflection, and direct action planning.

Move this World uses creative movement to inspire empathy, viewing movement as an embodiment of cultural knowledge. Through creative movement sessions attendees will practice active listening, conflict resolution, civic engagement, appreciating differences, and social awareness. The skills offered by the Move this World summit are both personal and political, providing techniques toward creating larger social change, as well as help for you while traveling that often stressful road.

For more information on the Move the World summit, email MTW’s Program Coordinator and Global Summit aficionado, Alejandra Paucar at apaucar@movethisworld.org

To register for the summit visit: http://movethisworld4thglobalsummit.eventbrite.com/

Saturday, Sept. 21st-Sunday, Sept. 22nd

National Academy Foundation School of Baltimore
601 N. Central Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201

Profile of the Week: Make Studio

Make Studio works to create an inclusive, supportive space for adults with disabilities to explore their artistic talents and create their own work. The artists that attend Make Studio’s programming are able to experiment with diverse techniques and mediums alongside the studio’s staff. Additionally Make Studio’s artists are able to earn income through the sale of their art via Make Studio’s online shop where the artists receive 70% of the price of their sold work. Make Studio is striving for their artists to receive recognition for their art and talent by not only promoting the sale of their work but creating exhibit opportunities for their artists to share their creative works with the public. Through their exhibitions artists are able to not only display their talent but can help destigmatize how our society views individuals with disabilities.

Make Studio has a new exhibit coming up entitled Take A Look: Mine Ours Yours. The exhibit will run from September 9th-October 17th, 2013 at The Julio Fine Arts Gallery in the College Center of Loyola University, 4501 North Charles St. An Artists Talk and Reception will be held on Thursday September 12th from 5pm-7pm. For more information on the Exhibit and the featured artists, view the event flyer

event

**If you would like to be featured as our Profile of the Week, go to artplusjustice.org and put yourself on the map!**

The Art of Justice

Bringing together the artwork of over 40 local and national artists is an exhibit to honor the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington is “The Art of justice.” The exhibit is organized by Michael Anthony Brown, Toni George, and Greg Scott and features works from a range of different genres. The Art of Justice reflects the artists’ perspectives of the historical and current state of justice in the U.S, as well as the continuing fight for racial equality. The Art of Justice is striving to encourage a “new generation of social awareness” to shape future activism for social justice.

Organizers of the exhibit are currently raising funds for the exhibit to further expand in size and continue spreading its message by traveling nationally. The opening reception for The Art of Justice will be held on Friday, August 23, 2013 from 5-8pm at the Mount Rainier Artists Loft Gallery. There will be a pre-march celebration featuring performances by Ayanna Gregory from her play, “Daughter of the Struggle.”  The gallery itself will be open daily from 12 noon to 7pm and the exhibit will run through Sunday, September 8th 2013.

 

For more information on the exhibit please visit theartofjustice.org

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