Tag Archive | collaboration

Continuum of Impact: Policy

Our final video addresses the way that art can be used to impact Policy. Jennifer Pelton from the Public Justice Center describes some of the ways that the PJC has incorporated art into advocating policy changes. Through the use of photography, music, youth created art, and other mediums, the PJC knows that art is an effective tool for providing a face to an issue and making the policy changes personal.

To view the complete interview with Jennifer Pelton of the Public Justice Center: Click Here 

To view the rest of the Continuum of Impact videos please visit the Baltimore Art + Justice Project YouTube channel

The Continuum of Impact Video Series is based on the Continuum of Impact created by Animating Democracy, the videos each highlight specific ways that social justice and art collaboration create an impact.

Continuum of Impact: Discourse

Through art we are able to create safe, affirming, comfortable, or even humorous spaces that allow many to engage in dialogues that couldn’t have happened elsewhere. Our Discourse video highlights the work of Hollaback! Baltimore and Theater Action Group who use art to open up and continue conversations. Shawna from Hollaback! Baltimore describes how individuals who have experienced street harassment have chalked the areas where they have been harassed; creating not only conversations about harassment but empowering experiences of reclaiming spaces. Theater is described by the Theater Action Group as a place where individuals can come together to play, engage, and create a temporary community that engages in dialogue which leads to further social change.

To view the complete interview with Hollaback! Baltimore: Click Here

To view the complete interview with Theater Action Group: Click Part One | Part Two

 To view the rest of the Continuum of Impact videos please visit the Baltimore Art + Justice Project YouTube channel.

Stay tuned next week for……. Attitudes!

The Continuum of Impact Video Series is based on the Continuum of Impact created by Animating Democracy, the videos each highlight specific ways that social justice and art collaboration create an impact.

Guest Blogger: Devlon Waddell Credentialization: A Social Construct

I am Devlon E Waddell; author of three published works (and contributor to others), publisher of a dozen, founder of an organization that has sent youth across the country and shifted the operating budget of a high school by well over a million dollars, developer and implementer of high school creative writing curriculum, founding member of a BCPS middle/high school, public speaker, mentor, coach, husband, father and the grinch that stole poetry…

What does this mean, toward the end of Social Justice? Absolutely nothing. In the realm of employment, a resume offers key indicators as to skill, will and fit, in terms of performing a specific task. Beyond a practical application of a certain skill-set, past experience serves only as a historical context for the work that lies ahead. However, with issues of equity, we are faced with “the fierce urgency of now”. There is no room for the revisiting of days gone by. And, by virtue of our humanity, we are all equal contributors in the building of a larger community.  It is with that in mind that I choose to engage. I find no hierarchy in interpersonal relationships. Regardless of credentials, we are equal; in voice, contribution and authority. The manifestation of such principles is simple. How is it done? At your next convening:

1. Don’t ask the folk you meet about their organizational affiliation. It doesn’t matter.

2. Do genuinely ask the folk you meet about their day. You may learn something meaningful.

3. Don’t present your agenda as if it is everyone’s top priority. It isn’t.

4. Do listen intently AND respond appropriately. Validation of voice does matter.

This notion of inherent authority beyond that which comes along with experience is laughable. Even as ‘do-gooders’ we cannot seem to escape such divisive constructs.

Profile of the Week: Cycles: Women’s Health Project

Cycles: Women’s Health Project is a project lead by community artist Whitney Frazier that is focused on addressing women’s health concerns in East Baltimore neighborhoods. Frazier is collaborating with women and girls to create an illustrated resource book about women’s health topics. Cycles uses art and social justice to educate about women’s health concerns and the issues with the western medical system’s treatment of women’s health. Once the book has been created, the female participants of Cycles will distribute the book within their communities and host their own visual storytelling workshops addressing the books topics.

Additionally, Frazier has used public bathrooms as a research tool by posting drawings and written prompts to spark responses by those using the public bathrooms. These stories and concerns collected from public restrooms are added to the different ways that Frazier has been doing research and collecting the stories of women and girls in Baltimore. Cycle’s Tumblr also encourages anyone interested in participating in the Cycles Project to contact Whitney Frazier.

 

**If you would like to be highlighted in our Profile of the Week please visit artplusjustice.org and put yourself on the map!**

Profile of the Week: Art with a Heart

Art with a Heart is a Baltimore organization that has been working since 2000 to provide visual art programs to underserved children, youth, and adults. This summer marks the 8th year of Art with a Heart’s Summer Job Program which creates opportunities for youth to learn valuable job skills while making marketable art. The art students in the program create is available to purchase at HeARTwares and will be displayed at the August 2nd event Shop & Bop.

job

Art with a Heart continues to provide community based programming, recently holding art programs at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore, McDonogh School, the Edgecombe Circle Elementary/Middle School, and Bristol House.edge

Art with a Heart’s HeARTwares is a retail store where the public can purchase items made through their different programs. The proceeds from the sale of art is shared by Art with a Heart and the artist or community partner. Additionally HeARTwares works in alignment with the Summer Job Program, providing real job experience, such as money handling and working with the public. HeARTwares is located at 623 W. 34th Street, and has an entrance at 3355 Keswick Road as well. HeARTwares is currently open Monday through Friday from 10 am to 6 pm, Saturday from 12 to 6 pm, and Sunday from 12 to 5 pm.

Upcoming Art with a Heart events:

August 2nd, 2013: Shop & Bop: See and purchase artwork created by students in the Summer Job Program

August 2nd, 2013, 5:00-10:00pm : Partnership with The Gathering, support students and shop their artwork

**Would you like to be featured as our Profile of the Week? Go to artplusjustice.org and put yourself on the map!**

Building “Strong Youth” with “Strong Art”

Strong Art Strong Youth: A Convening is bringing together those in Baltimore interested and invested in access to arts programs for Baltimore youth. On Saturday, June 22nd from 9am-1pm artists, activists, community members, organizers–everyone–are encouraged to come and take part in a series of exhibits and conversations on the experiences and status of using “strong art” to build “strong youth” in Baltimore.

The day’s events are separated into hour-long segments and attendees are invited to attend all or part of the day (for a complete schedule see below). The convening will begin with an exhibit of youth and artist mentor artworks, including a gallery talk with those artists exhibiting their work. Following the exhibit there will be a presentation of the Strong Art Strong Youth Report findings by Fanon Hill and Peter Bruun. Kenneth Morrison, Sarah Tooley, Muse 360 Arts, and Unchained Talent will also highlight access to art for youth in the city as well as work currently being done by youth in Baltimore.

Using the report’s findings, Fanon Hill and Peter Bruun will also propose recommendations on bettering access and quality of youth art programs in Baltimore. Other youth arts-related initiatives such as Any Given Child, Arts Education in Maryland Schools Alliance, Turnaround Artists, and the Baltimore Art + Justice Project will also be featured, along with the work they are doing and how it relates to the recommendations. Finishing off the day there will be roundtable discussions for attendees to share their thoughts on the Strong Art Strong Youth report and recommendations over a free, light lunch.

The BA+JP Community Dialogues have shown that there is a strong need for continued conversations on topics relating to art and social justice in Baltimore City as well as the desire for building stronger networks and collaborating. The Strong Arts Strong Youth: A Convening is another opportunity for interested individuals and organizations in Baltimore to learn what is happening in the city, what is being done by others, and who might be seeking partners to collaborate with.

The convening is free and completely open to the public. Additionally, all those who attend will receive an abstract of the Strong Art Strong Youth Report and can receive the complete report by email after the event. There will also be a Youth Arts Resource Table for any related program material that you would like to bring and share at the event.

To RSVP or for more information on the event please email: peter@bruunstudios.com or bcyri@hotmail.com

Where:

James E. Lewis Museum of Art in the Carl J. Murphy Center for Fine Arts
Morgan State University
2200 Argonne Drive, Baltimore MD 21251

When:

Saturday, June 22nd, 2013

Schedule:

9:00-10:00AM Part I: Artist Mentors Have Impact: Art Exhibit and Gallery Talk

10:00-11:00AM Part II: Strong Art Strong Youth Report Presentation

11:00-11:15AM Break

11:15AM-12:15PM Part III: Youth Arts Ecosystem & Recommendations

12:15-1:00PM Roundtable Discussions

Discussing Art and Advocacy at the BA+JP May Community Dialogue

The Baltimore Art + Justice Project’s latest community dialogue brought together local artists, activists, practitioners, community members, and organizers to discuss building (and maintaining) collaborative, working relationships between artists and non-profits. The dialogue was held in partnership with the Public Justice Center who were not only wonderful hosts but provided insight into their own experiences of bringing together the non-profit sector and artists in multiple successful ways.

Jennifer Pelton, Director of Development at PJC, described the work they do as focused on targeting the roots of poverty.  Pelton described how the advocacy driven organization had used powerful images and photographs of real life situations in Baltimore, such as tenant evictions, to convey the importance of taking action on specific issues. In addition to photography, the organization has collaborated with the Megaphone Project multiple times on films and brought in performers for their anniversary benefit. Pelton described that art makes individuals feel compelled do get involved in political advocacy, bridging the gap between the two communities: “Art makes us talk about difficult topics and justice gives us a course of action for those topics.”

Elliot Rauh and Jessica Garrett from Single Carrot Theatre also described in detail their experiences bridging artistic and non-profit communities. The members from the socially engaged theatre company described working to grow outreach and education programs through the theatre. One program in particular they discussed was their annual reading of the “Murder Ink” column from Baltimore’s City Paper. Without any fanfare the SC Theatre company has read aloud the names from the previous years’ column with the intent to not only bring up those individuals’ names again and have them remembered as Garrett stated that “every human being deserves to be acknowledged when they die.” Single Carrot also hopes to create a conversation through the readings explained by Rauh, “theatre sparks dialogue.”

Elliot Rauh, Murder Ink Reading

Elliot Rauh, Murder Ink Reading

The challenges of bringing together artists and non-profits were addressed during the dialogue and many thought the difficulties often rest in understanding the different communities, cultures, and priorities. Some artists might feel that non-profits have not provided the room for creative possibility while non-profits feel that artists might not respect their responsibilities or priorities. It was clear, however that the desire for collaboration was high and the need for a coalition was strong. Continually individuals discussed how necessary it was to build off of the assets that each community can bring, and make sure that we continue to maintain open communication. It’s clear that there are artists and non-profits working on the same issues in Baltimore City that can make incredible work when they collaborate.

Keeping the dialogue going:

What makes for a successful non-profit/artist partnership?

What are your experiences?

What do you think?

What Do You Think Baltimore?: Baltimore Think-A-Thon

On Friday May 24th an event is bringing together Baltimore artists, social activists, researchers, medical professionals, scientists, humanists, political representatives, and foundations to do some thinking. The Baltimore Think-A-Thon is an all day brainstorming event being held by the Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Focusing on addressing both black infant mortality and rising AIDS/HIV rates in the city, along with other possible issues raised by participants, those in attendance will be coming together across occupations and communities to discuss past, present, and future ways to address these issues.

The Think-A-Thon comes out of recent studies that have found the collaboration between arts and science practitioners in problem solving can create innovative and effective interventions. The varying backgrounds of the thinkers involved from art to science, to politics encourages that they will bring different skills, perspectives, and thinking styles to the discussion. During the day artists will be working to create preliminary sketches of the ideas thought up by the group. The works created throughout the day will be used later in the “Baltimore Stories Project,” a larger community based project.

The intense day of problem solving, thinking and discussing will be taking place on Friday, May 24, 2013 from 9:00am-3:00pm and will be followed by a reception and a poster session. The Think-A-Thon is being held in the Westminster Hall, located at 519 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

For more information and to register please visit http://www.arhu.umd.edu/thinkathon

Mapping Baltimore: GBCA’s Brown Bag

The Baltimore Art + Justice Project assisted yesterday with the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance’s “Map it Now” Brown Bag. BA+JP’s Kalima Young and Rebecca Yenawine from New Lens co-facilitated the packed event where many individuals presented their organizations’ maps and data collection experiences. Public Laboratory, Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, Baltimore Jazz Alliance, Story of Place Project, Arts Everyday, Power In Dirt, Baltimore Green Space were some of the groups whose efforts were shared and discussed at the event.

Throughout the conversation the importance of art in the community was continually referenced and the effect that research and visual tools, such as maps, can have on showing the positive impact art and cultural programs have on communities. Some of the issues and challenges that were raised related to collaborating and bringing in new people. The Greater Baltimore Tech Council and the Tech and Social Change Baltimore Meet up Group were discussed as two good ways that arts, cultural, and justice based workers could reach out to individuals in the tech community looking to collaborate.

Continuing the Conversation: What have been some of your challenges and experiences collecting data and mapping Baltimore’s cultural,  arts, and justice based communities? What have you found?

%d bloggers like this: