Tag Archive | funding

New Funding Opportunity for Baltimore Artists!

The Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance has begun collecting submissions for their new grant: The Rubys. The Rubys was created this year with start-up funding from the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation to provide project-based funding for new and established artists in the Baltimore area. Performing, visual, media, and literary artists who are doing work intended to impact their community are encouraged to apply for The Rubys Grant. The program will award up to $10,000 to an artist in each of the four grant categories: Performing Arts, Media Arts, Visual Arts, and Literary Arts.

To be eligible for the grant, an artist must be:

  • A resident of Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Anne Arundel County, Carroll County, Harford County, or Howard County at the time of application and when the grant is awarded.
  • A U.S. citizen or permanent legal resident.
  • At least 21 years old.
  • An active practicing artist who has pursued their profession in their chosen discipline for more than three years

Applications are currently being accepted and the application deadline is February 2, 2014. For more information on the application process, to apply, or for further information about the grant please visit here.

What Do You Think Baltimore?: Baltimore Think-A-Thon

On Friday May 24th an event is bringing together Baltimore artists, social activists, researchers, medical professionals, scientists, humanists, political representatives, and foundations to do some thinking. The Baltimore Think-A-Thon is an all day brainstorming event being held by the Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Focusing on addressing both black infant mortality and rising AIDS/HIV rates in the city, along with other possible issues raised by participants, those in attendance will be coming together across occupations and communities to discuss past, present, and future ways to address these issues.

The Think-A-Thon comes out of recent studies that have found the collaboration between arts and science practitioners in problem solving can create innovative and effective interventions. The varying backgrounds of the thinkers involved from art to science, to politics encourages that they will bring different skills, perspectives, and thinking styles to the discussion. During the day artists will be working to create preliminary sketches of the ideas thought up by the group. The works created throughout the day will be used later in the “Baltimore Stories Project,” a larger community based project.

The intense day of problem solving, thinking and discussing will be taking place on Friday, May 24, 2013 from 9:00am-3:00pm and will be followed by a reception and a poster session. The Think-A-Thon is being held in the Westminster Hall, located at 519 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

For more information and to register please visit http://www.arhu.umd.edu/thinkathon

Funding Opportunities Available for Community Greening Projects

Parks & People will be hosting grant workshops for three grants to fund community greening projects. The grants, which focus on community-led greening and service projects, would be a great opportunity for artists, community members, and organizations to receive funding to start or continue community projects.

Those interested in playground restoration and programs that support public parks can apply for the Partnership for Parks Grants. The grants provide awards ranging from $500-$5,000 and are co-sponsored through Baltimore City Department of Recreation & Parks and the Parks & People Foundation. Individuals and organizations interested in applying for the Partnerships for Parks Grants must attend a free workshop on either:

Tuesday, June 11, 2013  -or- Wednesday, May 29, 2013 6:00—8:00pm
Rec & Parks Office, Druid Hill Park, 3001 East Dr., Baltimore 21217

Community gardens, vacant lot restoration, and environmental education activities are just some of aims of the Neighborhood Greening & Clean Water Grants. The Clean Water Mini-Grant can provide up to $250 in funds for recipients, while the Neighborhood Greening Grant awards up to $1,000 in funds. Those interested in applying for either of the Neighborhood Green/Water grants must attend one of the following free workshops:

Wednesday,  May 29, 2013 6:00—8:00 p.m.
Parks & People Foundation, Stieff Silver Building, 800 Wyman Park Drive, Suite 010, Baltimore
Tuesday, June 4, 2013 6:00—8:00 p.m.
Zeta Center for Healthy & Active Aging, 4501 Reisterstown Road, Baltimore
 Wednesday, June 5, 2013 6:00—8:00 p.m.
Bon Secours Community Works, 26 North Fulton Avenue, Baltimore
Wednesday, June 12, 2013 6:00—8:00 p.m.
HEBCAC, 1212 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore

Individuals attending a workshop are asked to RSVP at least four days before the workshop they plan to attend. You can RSVP by contacting (410) 448-5663 x111 or valerie.shane@parksandpeople.

Two additional great resources for artists, community members, and organizations interested in greening spaces in Baltimore to check out are Baltimore Green Space and Power in Dirt.  These resources can help provide an idea of what is available and some of what is already going on in Baltimore.

 

Dancing for a Cause

Tomorrow evening, Saturday March 23rd the Eubie Blake National Jazz Institute and Cultural Center will be filled with two floors of dancing. Dancing for a Cause, the second annual fundraiser for Jubilee Arts, celebrates the many dance styles that originated within Harlem and have continued to grow across the country. The styles of Chicago Step, Hand Dance, and Line Dance, which will be highlighted at the event, are taught at Jubilee Arts “as a way to preserve and revive the legacy of arts in the African-American community.” In addition to an evening of dancing, guests will also enjoy light fare, performances, door prizes, and auctions. Dancing for a Cause is particularly timely following last month’s social and news media obsession with the Harlem Shake videos. Coverage of the videos were often void of any conversations regarding the dance /videos’ cultural or historical significance, highlighting how important and needed Jubilee Arts’ work is.

All proceeds for the event will help support the operations of Jubilee Arts and their programming which focuses on providing low cost dance, visual arts, creative writing and ceramics classes/programs to Baltimore communities of all ages.

Tickets for the event are $35 and can be purchased ahead of time online.

For more information on the event please visit the event page on Facebook.

When:
Saturday, March 23rd
8pm- 12am 
 
Where:
Eubie Blake Center- 847 North Howard St. 

Mapping: A Tool for Participatory Justice

By Nicole King

Neighborhoods of Baltimore

The Baltimore Art + Justice Project is focused on strengthening art and design-based collaborations to improve the lives of city residents. The strength of the project lies in its grounding in place, the city of Baltimore, while also creating a space for connections and community to grow. Arts districts are important social and economic engines for cities; however, for social justice to be truly achieved, the project needs to reach the overlooked areas of the city where art and justice may seem in short supply. The reality is that we simply need new tools and a new vision to better learn to see the connections that arts can provide in urban areas. We need a road map.

The method of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project includes creating such a road map in connection with Animating Democracy’s Mapping Initiative. This project has the potential to make the hidden visible and connect various resources for a more dynamic and lasting impact on Baltimore’s cultural landscape. At the December 2, 2011 Bmore Historic conference at the Maryland Historical Society, I attended a session on Spatial/Digital Humanities where mapping initiatives in the Baltimore region were discussed. One central question of the session was: Why mapping? What is so alluring about this tool at this specific moment?

People love maps. Maps help us navigate our day-to-day lives and enable us to see relationships and patterns. Moving beyond the practical aspects, exploring maps give us a new perspective on seeing place and our connections to it. Maps can be framed as an art form as well as a practical tool. Maps provide a context for understanding places and help to make social and political boundaries as well as geographic ones visible. However, as anyone who has worked with maps (in the form of artifacts, digital representations, or data visualizations) knows, maps only tell part of the story, and sometimes they even lie. Therefore, people (artists, historians, designers, preservationists, archivists, and the general public) need to fill in the blanks and provide the deeper context and connections. To achieve these connections with the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, the aspect of data collection is supplemented by community engagement on the ground. This project provides a tool for envisioning a more connected and just city, but it needs you to engage in dialogue, outreach, discussion, storytelling, and other interactive activities.

Maps are flat until people interact with them. Data is just numbers until connections, patterns, or ideas emerge. There are various mapping projects in urban areas that have directly intervened in the lives and spatial stories of the people and places that make cities work. The City of Memory map designed by City Lore in New York City provides the ability for users to add to the collection of stories. Digital Harlem: Mapping Race and Place in the 1920s allows the past of a specific neighborhood to come alive. Cleveland Historical is a free app that puts history and culture right at your fingertips. Working with the Cleveland Historical format, Baltimore Heritage, the city’s nonprofit historic and architectural preservation organization, recently developed Explore Baltimore Heritage, a website and smartphone application for both iPhone and Android devices featuring a map of historic neighborhoods and buildings from across the city.

My area of expertise is in place-based urban history and culture. However, I see history, culture, art, and community as essential tools for developing better and more just cities.  Often, the places we never really see are the very ones that offer new perspectives on our culture and our shared history. The Baltimore Art + Justice project uses a web-based mapping resource to provide artists, designers, arts organizations, community-based organizations, advocates, and funders a tool for advancing social justice in Baltimore.  All city residents from all walks of life need to make the connections and make this project come alive.

Maps matter when people use them.

Creative Cash

The Opening - photo by Kevin Griffin MorenoIn a thought-provoking and sobering series of articles for Salon, culture reporter Scott Timberg reveals troubling economic realities facing America’s “creative class.”

That term, coined over a decade ago by urban theorist Richard Florida, encompasses a wide array of architects, designers, performers, painters, writers, educators, entrepreneurs, and even scientists whom Florida cites as comprising nearly one-third of the U.S. workforce. According to Florida, these creators and innovators constitute the single biggest hope for urban economic revitalization. Inspired by Florida’s vision, cities including Baltimore created housing and development incentives to attract and retain members of the “creative class.”

A visit to Baltimore’s Station North Arts & Entertainment District on a random Friday night would seem to bear out this promise. Within the space of a few blocks, one can listen to a hip-hop duo perform at Joe Squared, catch a play at Single Carrot Theatre, attend a reading at Cyclops Books, or experience a Baltimore Rock Opera Society show at the newly restored Autograph Playhouse. These are but a few indicators of Baltimore’s surging arts scene, which has led some to claim that the city is in the midst of a cultural renaissance.

Yet underlying these signs of vibrancy are some disquieting economic figures. Timberg cites data from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bureau of Labor Statistics that reveal falling revenues and job opportunities for performing arts companies, musical groups, and individual artists, as well as architects, graphic designers, and photographers. Even as the U.S. begins to emerge from economic recession, the labor market prospects for artists and other creatives remain grim.

If Baltimore is serious about tapping the full potential of the “creative class,” the city and state need to build on the investments they have made

 

in the city’s cultural landscape. Official arts districts like Station North, Highlandtown, and the soon-to-be-designated Westside/downtown arts district represent one strategy for creating jobs, providing artist housing, and increasing the city’s cultural vibrancy. These are promising initiatives that should be sustained and expanded.

Creators and consumers of the arts can also play a vital role by working with groups like Maryland Citizens for the Arts to advocate for increased public funding for artists, arts, organizations, and cultural activities.

At the Art + Justice Project, we believe that arts can be a tool for positive social change. In order to help bring that change about, we need ensure that artists have the resources to produce their work and contribute to the common good.

BCF Community Arts Grants Available!

The Baltimore Community Foundation (BCF) believes the arts are a critical component of vibrant neighborhoods and a vibrant city, and therefore intends to make grants to programs that engage neighborhood residents in making art that benefits their communities; and forge partnerships among established arts institutions, community-based arts organizations, grassroots artists, and local neighborhoods.

BCF’s Neighborhood Grants Program provides Community Arts Grants of up to $7,500 to support projects conducted in partnership by neighborhood groups, local artists, and arts organizations to increase neighborhood vibrancy.

Applicant organizations must either have 501(c)(3) nonprofit status or apply through a nonprofit fiscal agent. Examples of suitable projects include:

  • An artist residency with a community organization
  • An arts project as part of an organizing/advocacy campaign
  • Professional development for a local artist who will use her new skills to design a neighborhood project

Applications for this first round of 2012 Community Arts Funding are due May 15, 2012. A second round of applications will be considered later in the year.

Download the application in MS Word format.

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