Tag Archive | resource

Continuum of Impact: Action

The anticipation can finally end as the Baltimore Art + Justice Project’s Continuum of Impact video series is complete and online! The series highlights the phenomenal work being done by Baltimore organizations and groups that are using art as a tool for social change. Based on the Continuum of Impact created by Animating Democracy, the videos each highlight specific ways that social justice and art collaboration create an impact.

Action, the first video in the series focuses on increasing participation. Art can be a powerful tool to get people involved and mobilized in their communities. Our Action video highlights the work of 901 Arts. 901 Arts is a community based youth arts organization in the Better Waverly neighborhood of Baltimore that provides opportunities for the children and youth in the community to express their artistic sides and develop as artists.

To view the complete interview with 901 Arts and the rest of the Continuum of Impact videos please visit the Baltimore Art + Justice Project YouTube page

Move This World 4th Global Summit

Looking for a way to get moving and develop strategies for social change this weekend? The Move This World 4th Global Summit is taking place is Baltimore this weekend on Saturday, September 21st through Sunday, September 22nd. The Summit brings together activists, artists, students and educators to learn Move this World’s evidence-based curriculum using creative movements to spark social change.  Those in attendance will collaborate in a variety of activities led by MTW’s PeaceMover Facilitators and global staff, engage in group dialogues, self-reflection, and direct action planning.

Move this World uses creative movement to inspire empathy, viewing movement as an embodiment of cultural knowledge. Through creative movement sessions attendees will practice active listening, conflict resolution, civic engagement, appreciating differences, and social awareness. The skills offered by the Move this World summit are both personal and political, providing techniques toward creating larger social change, as well as help for you while traveling that often stressful road.

For more information on the Move the World summit, email MTW’s Program Coordinator and Global Summit aficionado, Alejandra Paucar at apaucar@movethisworld.org

To register for the summit visit: http://movethisworld4thglobalsummit.eventbrite.com/

Saturday, Sept. 21st-Sunday, Sept. 22nd

National Academy Foundation School of Baltimore
601 N. Central Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201

Profile of the Week: Cycles: Women’s Health Project

Cycles: Women’s Health Project is a project lead by community artist Whitney Frazier that is focused on addressing women’s health concerns in East Baltimore neighborhoods. Frazier is collaborating with women and girls to create an illustrated resource book about women’s health topics. Cycles uses art and social justice to educate about women’s health concerns and the issues with the western medical system’s treatment of women’s health. Once the book has been created, the female participants of Cycles will distribute the book within their communities and host their own visual storytelling workshops addressing the books topics.

Additionally, Frazier has used public bathrooms as a research tool by posting drawings and written prompts to spark responses by those using the public bathrooms. These stories and concerns collected from public restrooms are added to the different ways that Frazier has been doing research and collecting the stories of women and girls in Baltimore. Cycle’s Tumblr also encourages anyone interested in participating in the Cycles Project to contact Whitney Frazier.

 

**If you would like to be highlighted in our Profile of the Week please visit artplusjustice.org and put yourself on the map!**

BA+JP Update

Greetings Baltimore Art + Justice Project supporters,

For anyone who may have taken the time to register for the BA+JP map over the past year, you may have wondered lately “what was all that for?” or perhaps “I remember signing up for that map… where is it?”

Well the answers to your questions are finally here. The Baltimore Art + Justice Map is live! Exciting right? The map (as is your profile if you were awesome and pre-registered) can be found at artplusjustice.org.

For anyone who attempted to register before and found the process confusing and may have not completed their profile, the website offers a new stream-lined registration that is, in fact, simple and fast.

While the website is live, we are still working on some tweeks and trying to polish it up in the next week. In the meantime, please check out the map and share it with friends who haven’t mapped themselves yet! Thanks again for your continued support of BA+JP!

Building “Strong Youth” with “Strong Art”

Strong Art Strong Youth: A Convening is bringing together those in Baltimore interested and invested in access to arts programs for Baltimore youth. On Saturday, June 22nd from 9am-1pm artists, activists, community members, organizers–everyone–are encouraged to come and take part in a series of exhibits and conversations on the experiences and status of using “strong art” to build “strong youth” in Baltimore.

The day’s events are separated into hour-long segments and attendees are invited to attend all or part of the day (for a complete schedule see below). The convening will begin with an exhibit of youth and artist mentor artworks, including a gallery talk with those artists exhibiting their work. Following the exhibit there will be a presentation of the Strong Art Strong Youth Report findings by Fanon Hill and Peter Bruun. Kenneth Morrison, Sarah Tooley, Muse 360 Arts, and Unchained Talent will also highlight access to art for youth in the city as well as work currently being done by youth in Baltimore.

Using the report’s findings, Fanon Hill and Peter Bruun will also propose recommendations on bettering access and quality of youth art programs in Baltimore. Other youth arts-related initiatives such as Any Given Child, Arts Education in Maryland Schools Alliance, Turnaround Artists, and the Baltimore Art + Justice Project will also be featured, along with the work they are doing and how it relates to the recommendations. Finishing off the day there will be roundtable discussions for attendees to share their thoughts on the Strong Art Strong Youth report and recommendations over a free, light lunch.

The BA+JP Community Dialogues have shown that there is a strong need for continued conversations on topics relating to art and social justice in Baltimore City as well as the desire for building stronger networks and collaborating. The Strong Arts Strong Youth: A Convening is another opportunity for interested individuals and organizations in Baltimore to learn what is happening in the city, what is being done by others, and who might be seeking partners to collaborate with.

The convening is free and completely open to the public. Additionally, all those who attend will receive an abstract of the Strong Art Strong Youth Report and can receive the complete report by email after the event. There will also be a Youth Arts Resource Table for any related program material that you would like to bring and share at the event.

To RSVP or for more information on the event please email: peter@bruunstudios.com or bcyri@hotmail.com

Where:

James E. Lewis Museum of Art in the Carl J. Murphy Center for Fine Arts
Morgan State University
2200 Argonne Drive, Baltimore MD 21251

When:

Saturday, June 22nd, 2013

Schedule:

9:00-10:00AM Part I: Artist Mentors Have Impact: Art Exhibit and Gallery Talk

10:00-11:00AM Part II: Strong Art Strong Youth Report Presentation

11:00-11:15AM Break

11:15AM-12:15PM Part III: Youth Arts Ecosystem & Recommendations

12:15-1:00PM Roundtable Discussions

What Do You Think Baltimore?: Baltimore Think-A-Thon

On Friday May 24th an event is bringing together Baltimore artists, social activists, researchers, medical professionals, scientists, humanists, political representatives, and foundations to do some thinking. The Baltimore Think-A-Thon is an all day brainstorming event being held by the Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Focusing on addressing both black infant mortality and rising AIDS/HIV rates in the city, along with other possible issues raised by participants, those in attendance will be coming together across occupations and communities to discuss past, present, and future ways to address these issues.

The Think-A-Thon comes out of recent studies that have found the collaboration between arts and science practitioners in problem solving can create innovative and effective interventions. The varying backgrounds of the thinkers involved from art to science, to politics encourages that they will bring different skills, perspectives, and thinking styles to the discussion. During the day artists will be working to create preliminary sketches of the ideas thought up by the group. The works created throughout the day will be used later in the “Baltimore Stories Project,” a larger community based project.

The intense day of problem solving, thinking and discussing will be taking place on Friday, May 24, 2013 from 9:00am-3:00pm and will be followed by a reception and a poster session. The Think-A-Thon is being held in the Westminster Hall, located at 519 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

For more information and to register please visit http://www.arhu.umd.edu/thinkathon

Funding Opportunities Available for Community Greening Projects

Parks & People will be hosting grant workshops for three grants to fund community greening projects. The grants, which focus on community-led greening and service projects, would be a great opportunity for artists, community members, and organizations to receive funding to start or continue community projects.

Those interested in playground restoration and programs that support public parks can apply for the Partnership for Parks Grants. The grants provide awards ranging from $500-$5,000 and are co-sponsored through Baltimore City Department of Recreation & Parks and the Parks & People Foundation. Individuals and organizations interested in applying for the Partnerships for Parks Grants must attend a free workshop on either:

Tuesday, June 11, 2013  -or- Wednesday, May 29, 2013 6:00—8:00pm
Rec & Parks Office, Druid Hill Park, 3001 East Dr., Baltimore 21217

Community gardens, vacant lot restoration, and environmental education activities are just some of aims of the Neighborhood Greening & Clean Water Grants. The Clean Water Mini-Grant can provide up to $250 in funds for recipients, while the Neighborhood Greening Grant awards up to $1,000 in funds. Those interested in applying for either of the Neighborhood Green/Water grants must attend one of the following free workshops:

Wednesday,  May 29, 2013 6:00—8:00 p.m.
Parks & People Foundation, Stieff Silver Building, 800 Wyman Park Drive, Suite 010, Baltimore
Tuesday, June 4, 2013 6:00—8:00 p.m.
Zeta Center for Healthy & Active Aging, 4501 Reisterstown Road, Baltimore
 Wednesday, June 5, 2013 6:00—8:00 p.m.
Bon Secours Community Works, 26 North Fulton Avenue, Baltimore
Wednesday, June 12, 2013 6:00—8:00 p.m.
HEBCAC, 1212 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore

Individuals attending a workshop are asked to RSVP at least four days before the workshop they plan to attend. You can RSVP by contacting (410) 448-5663 x111 or valerie.shane@parksandpeople.

Two additional great resources for artists, community members, and organizations interested in greening spaces in Baltimore to check out are Baltimore Green Space and Power in Dirt.  These resources can help provide an idea of what is available and some of what is already going on in Baltimore.

 

Mapping Baltimore: GBCA’s Brown Bag

The Baltimore Art + Justice Project assisted yesterday with the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance’s “Map it Now” Brown Bag. BA+JP’s Kalima Young and Rebecca Yenawine from New Lens co-facilitated the packed event where many individuals presented their organizations’ maps and data collection experiences. Public Laboratory, Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, Baltimore Jazz Alliance, Story of Place Project, Arts Everyday, Power In Dirt, Baltimore Green Space were some of the groups whose efforts were shared and discussed at the event.

Throughout the conversation the importance of art in the community was continually referenced and the effect that research and visual tools, such as maps, can have on showing the positive impact art and cultural programs have on communities. Some of the issues and challenges that were raised related to collaborating and bringing in new people. The Greater Baltimore Tech Council and the Tech and Social Change Baltimore Meet up Group were discussed as two good ways that arts, cultural, and justice based workers could reach out to individuals in the tech community looking to collaborate.

Continuing the Conversation: What have been some of your challenges and experiences collecting data and mapping Baltimore’s cultural,  arts, and justice based communities? What have you found?

Put Yourself on the Map!

Are you an artist, designer, creator, community organizer, or advocate working at the intersection of art and social justice within Baltimore?

The Baltimore Art + Justice Project is collecting data for an interactive map of art and social justice activity in Baltimore.

Put yourself on the map by going to www.mica.edu/bajp and complete the BA+JP questionnaire!

Please Note: If you work in Baltimore City but live in the surrounding counties, please use your Baltimore City address and zip code when creating your Animating Democracy account!

If you have any questions while completing the survey please contact Kalima Young at kyoung01@mica.edu

Mapping: A Tool for Participatory Justice

By Nicole King

Neighborhoods of Baltimore

The Baltimore Art + Justice Project is focused on strengthening art and design-based collaborations to improve the lives of city residents. The strength of the project lies in its grounding in place, the city of Baltimore, while also creating a space for connections and community to grow. Arts districts are important social and economic engines for cities; however, for social justice to be truly achieved, the project needs to reach the overlooked areas of the city where art and justice may seem in short supply. The reality is that we simply need new tools and a new vision to better learn to see the connections that arts can provide in urban areas. We need a road map.

The method of the Baltimore Art + Justice Project includes creating such a road map in connection with Animating Democracy’s Mapping Initiative. This project has the potential to make the hidden visible and connect various resources for a more dynamic and lasting impact on Baltimore’s cultural landscape. At the December 2, 2011 Bmore Historic conference at the Maryland Historical Society, I attended a session on Spatial/Digital Humanities where mapping initiatives in the Baltimore region were discussed. One central question of the session was: Why mapping? What is so alluring about this tool at this specific moment?

People love maps. Maps help us navigate our day-to-day lives and enable us to see relationships and patterns. Moving beyond the practical aspects, exploring maps give us a new perspective on seeing place and our connections to it. Maps can be framed as an art form as well as a practical tool. Maps provide a context for understanding places and help to make social and political boundaries as well as geographic ones visible. However, as anyone who has worked with maps (in the form of artifacts, digital representations, or data visualizations) knows, maps only tell part of the story, and sometimes they even lie. Therefore, people (artists, historians, designers, preservationists, archivists, and the general public) need to fill in the blanks and provide the deeper context and connections. To achieve these connections with the Baltimore Art + Justice Project, the aspect of data collection is supplemented by community engagement on the ground. This project provides a tool for envisioning a more connected and just city, but it needs you to engage in dialogue, outreach, discussion, storytelling, and other interactive activities.

Maps are flat until people interact with them. Data is just numbers until connections, patterns, or ideas emerge. There are various mapping projects in urban areas that have directly intervened in the lives and spatial stories of the people and places that make cities work. The City of Memory map designed by City Lore in New York City provides the ability for users to add to the collection of stories. Digital Harlem: Mapping Race and Place in the 1920s allows the past of a specific neighborhood to come alive. Cleveland Historical is a free app that puts history and culture right at your fingertips. Working with the Cleveland Historical format, Baltimore Heritage, the city’s nonprofit historic and architectural preservation organization, recently developed Explore Baltimore Heritage, a website and smartphone application for both iPhone and Android devices featuring a map of historic neighborhoods and buildings from across the city.

My area of expertise is in place-based urban history and culture. However, I see history, culture, art, and community as essential tools for developing better and more just cities.  Often, the places we never really see are the very ones that offer new perspectives on our culture and our shared history. The Baltimore Art + Justice project uses a web-based mapping resource to provide artists, designers, arts organizations, community-based organizations, advocates, and funders a tool for advancing social justice in Baltimore.  All city residents from all walks of life need to make the connections and make this project come alive.

Maps matter when people use them.

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